sexual politics

The Wife of Bath’s Tale from The Canterbury Tales is like a potted history of sexual politics:

Men and women are vulnerable to each other but they are not mutually vulnerable; women’s vulnerability to men came before men’s vulnerability to women.

Because of the horror of women’s vulnerability to men, Patriarchy is going to destroy men but Matriarchy intervenes and says; don’t destroy men yet, just take half of their power from them and give it to women.

Patriarchy takes away men’s power to have sex with women without their consent and gives it to women, so that it becomes women’s right not to have sex. This gives women power over men, making men vulnerable to women. This is the beginning of civilization in terms of sexual politics. In this situation, men are allowed to keep half of their power – which is half of the full complement of human rights. This means that men have power over women and women have power over men, because each of them has half of the full complement of human rights.

Then along comes Feminism and says women have only half of the full complement of human rights and this is obviously unjust, so the remainder of men’s rights – the other half of the full complement of human rights – must be taken from men and given to women.

But that would leave women with the full complement of human rights, and it would leave men with what remains of their half of the full complement – pending the complete removal of that half, and its transfer to women – which would mean the death of men, because men would not have either one of the two halves of the full complement of human rights, and women would have both halves.

moribund man

To be of any use to them, a man must turn his back on his family but only literally. With his back to them, he works for them. With his back to them, he protects them. With his back to them, he makes the world safe for them; and when he has made it safe enough, they’ll kill him.